Category Archives: Myanmar

David DuChemin, a man whose words are as richly textured as his magnificent photographs, recently wrote a blog post on the difference between an “Iconic Photograph [and] a Photographed Icon”. “If I can find something that resonates more strongly with the human heart or imagination, I have a shot at the kind of connection in a […]

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Tomatoes. Salad, salsa, pasta sauce, creamy curry, pizza, ratatouille, juice, gazpacho… the list goes on. Tomatoes have become central to cooking world over. In season, I keep them planted in my garden, and I always have plenty – large ones for cooking and sandwiches and small ones for salads – tucked in my fridge. Originally native to western-South […]

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Burmese markets are a feast for the senses: the angled light sneaking in through slatted bamboo walls and streaming under tent canopies and corrugated tin roofs; the riotous colours of freshly picked vegetables; the rich smells of packed dirt floors, freshly cut meat, and frying spices. In the stillness of dark corners and oppressive tropical heat, vendors […]

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You have to be early, and you have to be quick, to catch Theravada Buddhist monks on their morning alms rounds. For over 2,500 years, since the Buddha decided that monks and nuns should not cook or store their own food, Buddhist monks have walked alms rounds. The practice was intended to free religious monastics from the worldly burden of cooking […]

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Inle Lake in the Shan Hills of Myanmar may not be particularly large, but it is rich with culture. Its shores are laced with canals and waterways that give access to cities and villages housing about 70,000 people. Inle Lake is as ethnically diverse as the Shan State as a whole; pockets of Intha (“People of the Lake”), Shan, Taungyo, Pa’O (Taungthu), Danu, […]

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